William and Mary Law School

Past Recipients of the Brigham-Kanner Prize

The Brigham-Kanner Property Rights Prize has been awarded to many of the nation's leading property rights scholars.

 

Frank I. Michelman2004
 Frank I. Michelman is Robert Walmsley University Professor, Emeritus, at Harvard University, where he taught from 1963 to 2012. He is the author of Brennan and Democracy (1999), and has published widely in the fields of property law and theory, constitutional law and theory, comparative constitutionalism, South African constitutionalism, local government law, and general legal theory. Professor Michelman is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and a past President (1994-95) of the American Society for Political and Legal Philosophy. He has served on the Committee of Directors for the annual Prague Conference on Philosophy and the Social Sciences, the Board of Directors of the United States Association of Constitutional Law, and the National Advisory Board of the American Constitution Society. In 2005, Professor Michelman was awarded the American Philosophical Society’s Phillips Prize in Jurisprudence and, in 2004, the Brigham-Kanner Property Rights Prize.  In January, 1995, and again in January 1996, Professor Michelman served as a co-organizer and co-leader of Judges’ Conferences sponsored by the Centre on Applied Legal Studies of the University of the Witwatersrand, devoted to matters of constitutional law in South Africa. In December, 2011, Professor Michelman delivered the keynote address for a multi-day Conference on “The 20th Anniversary of Israel’s Human Rights Revolution,” at a session held at the Knesset, Jerusalem. 

 Professor Epstein
2005
Professor Richard A. Epstein is the inaugural Laurence A. Tisch Professor of Law at the New York University School of Law. He is also the James Parker Hall Distinguished Service Professor of Law and the director of the Law and Economics Program at the University of Chicago Law School. He is an Adjunct Scholar at the Cato Institute, the Peter and Kirsten Bedford Senior Fellow at the Hoover Institution, and a senior fellow at the University of Chicago Medical School’s Center for Clinical Medical Ethics. He has written on a wide range of legal and interdisciplinary topics and is the author of numerous works including Skepticism and Freedom: A Modern Case for Classical Liberalism (University of Chicago Press 2003), Simple Rules for a Complex World (Harvard University Press 1995), Bargaining with the State (Princeton University Press 1993) and Takings: Private Property and the Power of Eminent Domain (Harvard University Press 1985). He was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1985.


Professor Ely2006
James W. Ely, Jr., is Milton R. Underwood Professor of Law, Emeritus, and Professor of History, Emeritus, at Vanderbilt University. He has written about a wide range of topics in legal history and is the author of numerous works including The Guardian of Every Other Right: A Constitutional History of Property Rights (Oxford University Press, 3rd edition  2008), American Legal History: Cases and Materials (Oxford University Press, 3rd ed. 2005) (with Kermit L. Hall and Paul Finkelman), The Fuller Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy (ABC-CLIO 2003), and Railroads and American Law (University Press of Kansas 2001). Ely served as assistant editor of the American Journal of Legal History from 1987 to1989. Since joining the Vanderbilt faculty in 1979, he has also received numerous teaching awards.

Professor Radin2007
Professor Margaret Jane Radin is the Henry King Ransom Professor of Law at the University of Michigan Law School. Prior to joining the Michigan faculty in fall 2007, she was the William Benjamin Scott and Luna M. Scott Professor of Law, and director of Stanford Law School's Program in Law, Science and Technology. She also has been on the faculty of the University of Southern California Law Center and has been a visiting professor at UCLA and Harvard. Radin has published prolifically on property rights theory and institutions, commodification, intellectual property, and cyberlaw. Highlights of her property scholarship appear in Contested Commodities (Harvard University Press 1996) and Reinterpreting Property (University of Chicago Press 1993).

Professor Ellickson2008
Professor Robert C. Ellickson is the Walter E. Meyer Professor of Property and Urban Law at Yale Law School. Prior to joining the Yale faculty in 1988, he was a member of the law faculties at the University of Southern California and Stanford University. Professor Ellickson's books include The Household: Informal Order Around the Hearth (Princeton University Press 2008), Order Without Law: How Neighbors Settle Disputes (Harvard University Press 1991), Land Use Controls (with Vicki L. Been) (Aspen Law and Business, 3d ed 2005), and Perspectives on Property Law (with Carol M. Rose and Bruce A. Ackerman)(Aspen Law and Business, 3d ed 2002). He is a fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences and was President of the American Law and Economics Association in 2001.

Professor Pipes2009
Professor Richard E. Pipes is the Frank B. Baird, Jr., Professor of History, Emeritus, at Harvard University. Among his appointments, he served as director of Harvard University’s Russian Research Center from 1968-1973, as chairman of the CIA’s “Team B” to review Strategic Intelligence Estimates in 1976, and as director of East European and Soviet Affairs in President Ronald Regan’s National Security Council from 1981-1982. Professor Pipes’s books include Formation of the Soviet Union : Communism and Nationalism, 1917-1923 (Russian Research Center Studies 1954, 1964, 1998), Struve : Liberal On The Left, 1870-1905 (Russian Research Center Studies, 2 vols. 1970, 1980), Russia under the Old Regime (Penguin History 1974), The Russian Revolution (Vintage 1990), Russia under the Bolshevik Regime (Vintage 1994), Property and Freedom(Vintage 1999), Communism: A History (Modern Library 2001), Vixi: TheMemoirs of a Non-Belonger (Yale University Press 2003), and Conservatism and Its Critics (Yale University Press 2006). Professor Pipes was the 2007 recipient of the National Humanities Medal.

Professor Rose2010
Professor Carol M. Rose is the Ashby Lohse Chair in Water and Natural Resources at the University of Arizona James E. Rogers College of Law. Prior to joining the faculty at Arizona, she was the Gordon Bradford Tweedy Professor of Law and Organization at Yale University Law School. She has authored numerous articles and several books, including Perspectives on Property Law (Aspen 2d ed. 1995, 3d ed. 2002) (co-author, with Bruce Ackerman & Robert Ellickson) and Property and Persuasion: Essays on the History, Theory, and Rhetoric of Ownership (Westview Press 1994).


Sandra Day O'Connor2011
Justice Sandra Day O’Connor was honored with the 2011 prize at the eighth annual conference, which was held in Beijing. The 2011 conference was co-sponsored by Tsinghua University School of Law and was a featured event during the university’s celebration of the 100th anniversary of its founding.

Justice O’Connor served as an associate justice of the Supreme Court from 1981 to 2006. She became chancellor of the College of William & Mary following her retirement from the judiciary. In May 2010, the William & Mary Law School faculty awarded her its highest honor, the Marshall-Wythe Medallion, in recognition of her exceptional accomplishments and leadership. Justice O’Connor served as an Arizona assistant attorney general from 1965 to 1969, when she was appointed to a vacancy in the Arizona Senate. In 1974, she ran successfully for trial judge, a position she held until she was appointed to the Arizona Court of Appeals in 1979. Eighteen months later, on July 7, 1981, President Ronald Reagan nominated her to the Supreme Court. In September 1981, she became the Court’s 102nd justice and its first female member.                                     

Professor Krier2012
Professor James E. Krier, Earl Warren DeLano Professor of Law at the University of Michigan,  teaches courses on property, trusts and estates, behavioral law and economics, and pollution policy. His research interests are primarily in the fields of property and law and economics, and he is the author or coauthor of several books, including Environmental Law and Policy (with R.B. Stewart) (Bobbs-Merrill Co. 1978), Pollution and Policy (with E. Ursin) (University of California Press 1977) and Property (Aspen Publishing, 7th edition 2010). His most recent articles have been published in Harvard Law Review, Supreme Court Economic Review, UCLA Law Review, and Cornell Law Review. A professor of law at UCLA and Stanford before joining the Michigan Law faculty in 1983, he has been a visiting professor at both Harvard University Law School and Cardozo School of Law.

Professor Merrill2013
Professor Thomas W. Merrill is a scholar of property, administrative, and environmental law, and is the Charles Evans Hughes Professor at Columbia Law School. His books include Property: Takings (with David A. Dana) (Foundation Press, 2002), Property: Principles and Policies (2d ed., with Henry E. Smith) (Foundation Press, 2012), and The Oxford Introductions to U.S. Law (with Henry E. Smith) (Oxford University Press, 2010). His many articles have appeared in publications such as Harvard Law Review, New York University Law Review, University of Pennsylvania Law Review, and Yale Law Journal.