Past Events

2015-2016 Academic Year

In the fall of 2015, HSLC hosted Suzannah Linton as a distinguished lecturer to discuss women accused of international crimes. In the spring of 2016, HSLC welcomed former First Chief Prosecutor, Fred Borch, in February. Later that spring, HSLC presented a symposium on the Iran Nuclear Accord. 

Symposium: Iran Nuclear Accord: A Stunning Diplomatic Success or a Dangerous Path?

IranAccord

In April of 2016, with sponsorship from the Reves Center for International Studies, HSLC hosted four distinguished experts, including Newell Highmith, Deputy Legal Advisor for the Department of State; Orde Kittrie, Professor of Law at Arizona State University and Former Lead Attorney for Nuclear Affairs for the Department of State; and Lawrence Wilkerson, Adjunct Professor of Government & Public Policy at the College of William & Mary and Former Chief of Staff to Former Secretary of State Colin Powell. Jeffrey Kaplow, Assistant Professor of Government at the College of William & Mary, moderated the Symposium.

Trials of Terrorists by Military Commissions: The Experiences of the First Chief Prosecutor, presented by Fred Borch

FredBorch

Fred L. Borch III presented on his work as Chief Proseuctor for the Guantanamo Bay Military Commissions, discussing his responsibility for directing the overall prosecution efforts of the U.S. in military commissions involving alleged terrorists. He is currently the Regimental Historian and Archivist for the U.S. Amry Judge Advocate General's Corps. Today, he is the only full-time military legal historian in the U.S. Department of Defense.

Mr. Borch was a career military lawyer in the U.S. Army Judge Adovcate General's Corps from 1980 to 2005. During that period he served in a variety of legal assignments in the U.S. and overseas, including Professor of Criminal Law at the Army Judge Advocate General's School in Charlottesville, Virginia (1990 to 1993) and Professor of International Law at the naval War College, Newport, Rhode Island (2001 to 2003). He specialized in legal issues involving terrorism, anti-terrorism, counter-terrorism, and homeland security (February 23rd, 2016). 

Women Accused of International Crimes, presented by Dr. Suzannah Linton

DrLinton

In this presentation at William & Mary, Dr. Linton spoke about her recent academic work on Women Who Commit International Crimes. Her research is bringing to light a matter of global significance that challenges the dominant narrative and raises major challenges across disciplines. Her talk focused on the issue of equality in the criminal justice system, and whether criminal proceedings for international crimes raise particular issues that require women to be treated differently.

Suzannah Linton, is an international consultant to the United Nations Development Programme and a visiting fellow at the British Institute of International and Comparative Law. She has served as a UN Prosecutor for Serious Crimes in East Timor, at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia and the Claims Resolution Tribunal for Dormant Accounts in Switzerland, and with UN and other international missions in Cambodia, Indonesia, East Timor, Bosnia-Herzegovina, Croatia and elsewhere (November 5th, 2015).

2014-2015 Academic Year

In the 2014-2015 academic year, HSLC hosted four lectures addressing various international human rights and security issues.

Documenting Human Rights Country Conditions in Closed and Repressive SocietiesMs. Lord discussed the difficulties of monitoring human rights abuses in repressive societies. Her work focuses on the rights of marginalized groups, human rights treaty negotiation and implementation, and health and human rights law. Ms. Lord is currently the senior vice president for human rights and inclusive development at the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) at Syracuse University College of Law where she oversees international legal research and global programming (February 2015).

Robinson (left) with Professor Nancy Combs

Defending the Devil: Challenges at International Criminal Tribunals. International criminal defense lawyer Mr. Robinson shared his experience representing alleged war criminals and discussed problems concerning international criminal tribunals. He served as legal advisor to former Bosnian Serb President Radovan Karadzic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia as well as many other alleged war criminals. Mr. Robinson is also the author of the legal thriller, “The Tribunal” (January 2015).

Masters

ISIS and the Islamic State: The Rise of a Security Threat and the American-led Response. Dr. Masters discussed the history of ISIS, the threat it poses the world and the role the United States plays in addressing that threat. Dr. Masters’ research focuses broadly on international security and specifically on collective action and terrorism, structural theories of terrorism, and foreign imposed regime change (November 2014).

Dr. Etcheson (left) with student Josh Johnson

Sex, Laws and Videotape: A Mendicant on the Frontiers of International Justice. Dr. Etcheson shared his experience in Cambodian international tribunals and the peace process after the Khmer Rouge. He also wrote the book, “After the Killing Fields: Lessons from the Cambodian Genocide” (October 2014).

Previous Years

Exploring the Prosecution of Somali Pirates, presented by Benjamin Hatch, Deputy Chief of the United States Attorney’s Office, Criminal Division in the Norfolk branch of the Eastern District of Virginia, sharing his experiences with convicting the three Somali pirates associated with the abduction and murder of four US citizens on The Quest in February 2011. 

Investigating the North Korean Gulag: The UN Commission of Inquiry into Crimes against Humanity by the North Korean Regime, presented by Janet Lord, senior vice president for human rights and inclusive development at the Burton Blatt Institute (BBI) at Syracuse University College of Law, explaining the human rights abuses in North Korea with a specific focus on the disabled. 

Defining maritime policy: Is there any difference between Greenpeace and Somali pirates?, presented by Professor Goran Sluiter, an professor and international law practitioner from Amsterdam, addressing the current legal doctrine of piracy and sharing experiences of defense work for the Somali pirates. 

Distinguished Lecture Series Past Events

Reimagining Child Soldiers in International Law and Policy, presented by Mark Drumbl, Professor of Washington & Lee Law School, addressing how to prevent child soldiering, reintegrate child soldiers, and engage child soldiers in other post-conflict reconciliation reforms (November 15, 2012).

"All Is Fair In Art and War": Confiscation of Cultural Property During Times of Armed Conflict, panel discussion with Dr. Alan Gerson, Ambassador Pavlos Anastasiades, and Marion Werkheiser (March 21, 2011). Click here to read more.

The Consolidation of Democracy in Panama after Noriega, presented by Jaime Alemán, Ambassador to the United States from the Republic of Panama (January 14, 2010).

Panel: Protecting America Post-Guantanamo, co-hosted by Human Rights First, and featuring a group distinguished retired military leaders addressing the national security benefits of closing the Guantanamo Bay prison facility (November 19, 2009) .

The Role of National Human Rights Institutions in Europe, presented by Julie Mertus, Professor and Co-Director of the MA program in Ethics, Peace and Global Affairs at American University (November 16, 2009) .

Panel: International Human Rights, featuring Rashida Manjoo, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Prevention of Violence against Women; Janet Lord, Blue Law International; and Michael Stein, William & Mary Law School (October 27, 2009) .

Enemy of the State: The Trial and Execution of Saddam Hussein, presented by Michael Newton, Professor at Vanderbilt University Law School, who helped lead international law experts who prepared the judges and prosecutors of the court that tried Saddam Hussein (October 22, 2009).

The West Bank: Conflict, Human Rights and the Rule of Law, presented by Hussein Abu El Hawa, Senior Legal Education Coordinator of the NETHAM Rule of Law Project, and Dr. Mohammad Shalaldeh, Dean of Al-Quds Law School in East Jerusalem (October 20, 2009) .

Cross Border Transactions in Emerging Markets, presented by Peter Belk, President and CEO of Atlas International Partners LLC, an investment advisory firm focusing on middle market opportunities in emerging markets (October 19, 2009) .

Global Warming: A Second Coming for International Law?, presented by Deepa Badrinarayana, Professor at Chapman University School of Law (September 30, 2009) .

Diagonal Regulation and Climate Change, presented by Hari Osofsky, Washington and Lee University Law Professor, exploring the need for climate regulation at all levels of government to address the effects of greenhouse gas emissions (September 2, 2009) .

The Current State of Negotiations between Greece and Turkey with respect to the Republic of Cyprus, address by the Honorable Ambassador Andreas S. Kakouris, Ambassador to the United States from the Republic of Cyprus (November 3, 2008).

American Values & National Security: Does Torture Keep Us Safe? Cosponsored by the Campaign to Ban Torture, this panel discussion featured a retired military leader, an intelligence expert, and a local faith leader  (October 27, 2008).

Why Torture Does Not Work: A Military Perspective, a roundtable discussion co-sponsored by Human Rights First, of high-ranking military officers who have spoken out against the use of torture and coercive techniques of interrogation (October 6, 2008) .

An International Holistic Approach to Dealing with Global Warming, presented by Pep Fuller, former Senior Representative for Oceana and Counselor for International Affairs at the EPA (October 1, 2008) .

Water Privatization Trends in the U.S.: Issues of Human Rights and National Security, presented by Professor Tony Arnold, Boehl Chair in Property and Land Use of the Louis D. Brandeis Law School (September 16, 2008) .

Privatizing Justice: Representing the Victims of Terrorism and Human Rights Abuses, presented by Dr. Allan Gerson, co-author (with Newsweek Senior Editor Jerry Adler) of the book The Price of Terror: Lessons of Lockerbie for a World on the Brink.  Co-sponsored by the George Tayloe Ross Memorial Lecture Series (September 10, 2008).

National Security Law in the 21st Century: A Practitioner's View, presented by Major General Charles Dunlap, Deputy Judge Advocate General of the U.S. Air Force (February 13, 2008).

The Northern Ireland Peace Process: How Pertinent a Model for Other Conflicts? presented by Mitchell Reiss, Professor of Law and Vice Provost for International Affairs, College of William & Mary and President's Special Envoy for the Northern Ireland Peace Process (January 31, 2008).

Atrocity, Punishment and International Law, presented by Mark Drumbl, class of 1975 Alumni Professor and Director of the Transnational Law Institute, Washington & Lee University School of Law (January 23, 2008) .

When, If Ever, Should Torture Evidence Be Admissible? presented by Michael Scharf, Professor and Director of the Frederick K. Cox International Law Center, Case Western Reserve University School of Law (November 1, 2007).

Terrorism and the Convergence of Criminal and Military Detention Models, presented by Robert Chesney, Associate Professor, Wake Forest University School of Law (October 10, 2007).  

Human Rights at Stake in the War on Terror, presented by Jordan Paust, Baker Law Center Professor, Law Center of the University of Houston (September 27, 2007).

Seeking Justice in the Military Commissions, presented by Neal Katyal, Professor of Law at Georgetown University (September 15, 2006).

Islam, Human Rights and Democracy, presented by Shirin Ebadi, 2003 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate (January 29, 2006).

Doing Well by Doing Right: Values in American Foreign Policy and the Struggle against Terrorism, presented by Stephen Rickard, acting Director of the Open Society Institute's Washington Office (November 14, 2005).  

Detainee Operations in the War on Terror, presented by MG John D. Altenberg, USA (ret.) (November 9, 2005).

Mass Justice for Mass Atrocity: Cautionary Lessons from Post-Genocide Rwanda, presented by Lars Waldorf, Project Leader at the New School's World Policy Institute (October 5, 2005).

America's Role in a Changed World, presented by Gen. Anthony Zinni, USMC (ret.) (September 26, 2005).  

Courts and Military Detainees: The Overlooked Virtues of Deferential Review, presented by David A. Martin, Professor at University of Virginia Law School (April 18, 2005).  

An Introduction to the Iraqi Special Tribunal: Trying Saddam Hussein, presented by Professor Linda Malone and the students of the 2004 Iraqi Special Tribunal Clinic (April 7, 2005).

Reflections on the War on Terror, presented by John Yoo, Professor of Law at the University of California at Berkeley School of Law (April 4, 2005).  

Justice, Judgment and Jurisdiction, presented by Madeline Morris, Duke Law School Professor and director of the Duke/Geneva Institute in Transnational Law (March 29, 2005).

Criminalization of Landmine Use by Illegal Armed Groups and International Law, presented by Luz Nagle, Stetson University Professor of Law (March 21, 2005).  

Legal Issues Surrounding the Guantanamo Bay Detention, presented by Erwin Chemerisnky, Duke Law School Alston & Baird Professor of Law. Co-sponsored by the Institute of Bill of Rights (March, 14, 2005).  

The New Mercenaries? Law and Policy of the Civilianization of Military Operations presented by Jeffrey K. Walker, Senior Fellow at Georgetown University's Institute for Law and Politics (March 1, 2005).  

Bait and Switch: Human Rights and U.S. Foreign Policy, presented by Julie A. Mertus, American University Associate Professor of International Relations (February 18, 2005).  

Human Rights in Classical Islamic Law presented by Tamara Sonn, William and Mary Kenan Professor of Humanities (January 25, 2005).

Miscellaneous Events
Symposium: From "Might Makes Right" to "Smart Power": The Shift in the U.S. National Security Strategy and its Global Implications for the Rule of Law 

Co-hosted by the International Law Society, Multicultural Law Students Association, the Human Security Law Center, and the Post-Conflict Justice Program (October 16, 2010).  

The symposium focused on President Obama's 2010 National Security Strategy and the emphasis it placed on promoting respect for human rights, effectiveness of the criminal justice system, and the rule of law as a means of making the United States more secure. 

Salzburg International Nuclear Law Platform Against Nuclear Dangers

Salzburg (PLAGE) held an international expert and NGO conference on "Updating International Law" in Salzburg, Vienna October 20-23, 2005. The conference was prepared in cooperation with John Van Dyke (University of Hawaii) and Michael Geistlinger (University of Salzburg), both international law professors. 

Human Security Law Center Director Professor Linda Malone presented What Issues Require Further Development: Focusing on Developing a Comprehensive Liability Regime, Transboundary Equity, Intergenerational Equity, and the International Law Commission Draft on State Responsibility.

For more information: http://www.updatingnuclearlaw.at/

Women and War

Co-hosted by the William and Mary Journal of Women and Law and the Human Security Law Center (February 12, 2005). 

The continuing presence of United States military forces in Iraq has greatly heightened American awareness of many of the issues related to armed conflict. It seems that not a day goes by that reporters don't speak about missionary beheadings by terrorists, or politicians don't debate the merits of holding "free" elections in a country wracked with bloodshed.

These issues, and others like them, have been slowly pushed to the forefront of America's discussion circles--and will surely remain there for years to come. In an effort to widen the scope of our national dialogue on armed conflict, the William and Mary Journal of Women and the Law and the Human Security Law Center co-sponsored the "Women and War" symposium of Saturday, February 12th.

Global Terrorism and Its Impact on Sustainable Development

Co-hosted by William and Mary Environmental Law and Policy Review and the Human Security Law Center (February 4, 2005).

In four panels over two days, speakers addressed issues such as the scientific and economic premises for various sustainable growth strategies; the positive and negative results of current environmental policies on communities and individuals; the impact of recent terrorist attacks on growth policies; and improvements to existing environmental and sustainable development policies. In light of 9/11 and the War on Terror, the symposium also addressed the relationship between global security and environmentally friendly development on both a domestic and international level.