William and Mary Law School

Japanese Festival

The Japanese love festivals (matsuri).  Tokyo has several impressive ones throughout the year, and so do the other prefectures.  My friend and I were lucky to attend a matsuri

The festival mood was strong.  Throngs of people were being directed by officers from the metro station to the shrine where the festival was taking place.  The crowd consisted mainly of young people dressed up in summer yukata. 

So what do you do at these festivals?  Eat, of course!  There was food, food, and more food.  Everything from Japanese fried chicken, skewered potato swirls, grilled squid, steak-on-a-stick, lemonade, and more.  Everything we tried was delicious.  Want my advice?  Start out by scoping out the festival grounds first.  Yes, I understand it is hot, and yes, I understand it is crowded and you can’t move.  But trust me, find out what you want to eat first and then go for those items.  Otherwise every other stall will look as delicious as the one before, and before you know it, you will have emptied the last yen out of your wallet and will be so stuffed you can’t move.  Left without a single yen because of your lack of strategic foresight, you will regret the day that you walked out of the matsuri before trying that grilled squid.  I’m not bitter-- I promise.  But I am an expert now, so trust me on this one.

In addition to food (yes, I know, what else could possibly matter?), there was also a haunted house?  I use a question mark because I am not entirely sure that is what it was, but that’s my best guess.  After getting elbowed left and right got old, which did does awfully quickly, we called it a night-- but not before taking pictures for your viewing pleasure.  Enjoy!

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