William and Mary Law School

Obruni in the Neighborhood

After being in the country for a few weeks, I have learned to appreciate and enjoy all the cultural differences I have encountered. It is quite difficult to describe all my experiences in a blog post. Words and pictures can not capture the beauty of the country or Ghanaian culture. 

In Takoradi I lived with the most amazing host family. My host mother, Roberta, is a director of a private school in Ghana, and is the most welcoming host mother. She immediately welcomed me into her home and made me feel a part of the family. On the first night in Ghana we lost power and spent the night talking outside. We lost power every night for the first week and there was no running water so I spent many nights taking cold bucket showers in the dark. Although it was an adjustment living without electricity and running water, I am extremely grateful to have experienced that lifestyle. It makes you understand what is truly important and necessary in life, as well as appreciate everything you do have in life. 

I was one of the only foreigners in Takoradi and I only saw about 5 foreigners in the two weeks I have been here. Foreigners are called "Obruni" and while walking the streets or through my neighborhood everyone yells "obruni" to get your attention. Children especially love to talk to foreigners and they will chase after you yelling "obruni, obruni". They even have a song they sing when they meet obrunis. The children are so well behaved and beautiful. I love walking through my neighborhood everday on my way to work and seeing all the children and playing with them when I get home.

Although living in Ghana is very different from life in America, I truly enjoy the simplicity of living here and the easy-going, friendly personalities of all the Ghanaians I meet. I look forward to the next 2 months and all the challenges and adventures I will encounter during my stay here.