Faculty Blogs

2016

April 22 - In a post titled "We Need More Reagan, Not Less," Professor Alan Meese rebutted David Brooks' contention that Republicans should reject Ronald Reagan's worldview and policies. Read the post.

March 18 - In a post at the Originalism Blog titled "An Exchange on the Senate's 'Advice,'" Professor Mike Ramsey quoted from a March 5 post by Professor Alan Meese rebutting the Vice President's claim that Article II, Section 2 somehow requires the Senate to consider the President's Supreme Court nominees.  Read Professor Ramsey's post.

March 5 - In a post titled "On the Senate's Absolute Discretion to Refuse to Consider Nominees," Professor Alan Meese takes issue with Vice President Biden's claim that Article II requires the Senate to consider Presidential nominees. Read the post.

February 29 - Professor Alan Meese takes issue with Bruce Ackerman's claim that an independent run by Michael Bloomberg will result in a constitutional crisis. Read the post.

February 23 - In a post titled "Yale Really Does Protect Free Expression (For Now)," Professor Alan Meese took issue with The Economist's claim that the University of Chicago accords more protection to free expression than Yale. Read the post.

February 16 - Professor Alan Meese published a tribute to Justice Antonin Scalia. Read the post.

February 5 - Professor Alan Meese celebrated the decision by the William and Mary Board of Visitors to extend the appointment of Taylor Reveley as President of William and Mary. Read the post.

January 23 - In a time when the country is, in his words, "in the grip of a great fear—fear of foreign terrorism," Professor Timothy Zick blogged about the "cosmopolitan" dimension of the First Amendment, "one that is concerned with preserving and protecting cross-border expressive and religious rights." Read the post in Ten Miles Square (a blog by the staff and friends of the Washington Monthly). Professor Zick's most recent book is "The Cosmopolitan First Amendment: Protecting Transborder Expressive and Religious Liberties" (Cambridge University Press, 2014).

January 22 - In a post titled "Should Candidates (and Voters) Be More Optimistic?" Professor Alan Meese explained why Americans are less optimistic about their economic future than they were in the late 1980s. Read the post.