Directory Page Title"Taken together, my experiences with the Center for Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding were the highlight of my time at William & Mary. The coursework in comparative law enabled me to study the law as more than a profession of practice. Through exposure to different legal systems, I gained an expanded and deepened understanding of governance, constitutionalism, and law. Both courses and internships provided opportunities to explore truly unique areas of the law about which I was passionate while honing my research skills. But for these experiences, I would not be working at the U.S. Institute of Peace. I’m endlessly grateful to Professor Warren and the Center for these incredible opportunities.

Nicole Cochran (2018)

Senior Program Specialist in Governance, Justice and Security, U.S. Institute of Peace

About

Nicole Cochran is a Senior Program Specialist in Governance, Justice and Security at the U.S. Institute of Peace. In this role, she provides research, programmatic, and operational support to programs in preventive diplomacy and security sector reform.

While at William & Mary, Nicole interned twice through Professor Warren’s Center for Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding. During her first summer of law school, she researched land law and assessed the effects of land titling efforts and large-scale concessions on land rights for Open Development Cambodia. She later worked as a summer research assistant for the U.S. Institute of Peace, researching internal security law and hybrid community policing models for the Justice and Security Dialogues Program.

After graduating from law school, she obtained a LL.M. at McGill University with a concentration in comparative law, particularly focusing on indigenous constitutionalism. She also holds a master’s in public policy from William & Mary and is an associate member of the Virginia State Bar.

Quote
"Taken together, my experiences with the Center for Comparative Legal Studies and Post-Conflict Peacebuilding were the highlight of my time at William & Mary. The coursework in comparative law enabled me to study the law as more than a profession of practice. Through exposure to different legal systems, I gained an expanded and deepened understanding of governance, constitutionalism, and law. Both courses and internships provided opportunities to explore truly unique areas of the law about which I was passionate while honing my research skills. But for these experiences, I would not be working at the U.S. Institute of Peace. I’m endlessly grateful to Professor Warren and the Center for these incredible opportunities.